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10 Marketing Questions

10 Marketing Questions

10 Marketing Questions

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Every business should be in-tune with their unique marketing needs. This article was shared privately so there’s no link, but I sure hope you enjoy the content. And remember if you need help with your marketing, your online presence, accounting, or other services; keep our Online Business Management and Virtual Assistant Network in mind. At The Write Hand, LLC we strive to be your one-stop for all your business needs.

10 Marketing Questions

Here are 10 questions to consider before writing a marketing plan. Even if you have a marketing plan it is a good idea to review these questions on a regular basis. Hopefully, you’ll be able to make time to at least consider the questions, or better yet write the answers down. This week engage your employees and others (not necessarily customers) who know your business well. Take particular note of differences of others’ responses to your own.

We’ll take a look at 10 more questions next week.

1. Describe your business in 30 words or less.
Listen for: Other adjectives that you didn’t think of and specific skills/abilities that may make you unique.

2. SWOT Analysis – Outline your business’ Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.
Listen for: Contradictions or misconceptions from your own perspective. An outsider’s view can be very helpful.

3. What is your mission statement/vision?
Listen for: Your employees to either mimic or say the opposite of your vision. This is an opportunity to get the staff on the same page.

4. Where was the business 10 years ago and where do you envision it 5, 10 and 20 years from now?
Listen for: No one can predict the future. What are your managers and personal contacts thinking?

5. Who is your clientele?
Listen for: Again, another point of view. Maybe your counter staff sees your typical customer very differently than you do.

6. What was is the best thing you have heard a customer say about your business?
Listen for: Something you’ve never heard before.

7. How about the worst thing you have heard?
Listen for: The thing you don’t want to hear.

8. How have you obtained most of your business?
Listen for: The unexpected. Unless you have been proactive in tracking new customers, you may be surprised.

9. How frequently do you communicate with your current customers and how?
Listen for: The comment that you don’t communicate enough and through the right channels.

10. Who are your competitors?
Listen for: Another surprise. It may not be the drycleaner down the street. It may be that there are consumers out there that don’t understand the benefit of using a professional clothing care specialist.

 

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10 Bad Habits You Must Eliminate from Your Routine

10 Bad Habits You Must Eliminate from Your Routine

“Chains of habit are too light to be felt until they are too heavy to be broken.”   — Warren Buffett

I found this article rather interesting. I’m not sure I believe they are the TOP 10 but they are certainly excellent TIME MANAGEMENT TIPS. I hope you find value in these tips and help yourself create better habits for work/life balance. And remember, if you need “back office support” for your business, The Write Hand, LLC is here to help you take back your time.
FULL ARTICLE CREDITS: click here
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10 Bad Habits You Must Eliminate from Your Routine

When it comes to productivity, the little things make all the difference. Quit sabotaging yourself with these bad habits. You are the sum of your habits. When you allow bad habits to take over, they dramatically impede your path to success. The challenge is bad habits are insidious, creeping up on you slowly until you don’t even notice the damage they’re causing.

Breaking bad habits requires self-control — and lots of it. Research indicates that it’s worth the effort, as self-control has huge implications for success.

University of Pennsylvania psychologists Angela Duckworth and Martin Seligman conducted a study where they measured college students’ IQ scores and levels of self-control upon entering university. Four years later, they looked at the students’ grade point averages (GPA) and found that self-control was twice as important as IQ in earning a high GPA.

The self-control required to develop good habits (and stop bad ones) also serves as the foundation for a strong work ethic and high productivity. Self-control is like a muscle — to build it up you need to exercise it. Practice flexing your self-control muscle by breaking the following bad habits:

1. Using your phone, tablet or computer in bed.

This is a big one that most people don’t even realize harms their sleep and productivity. Short-wavelength blue light plays an important role in your mood, energy level and sleep quality. In the morning, sunlight contains high concentrations of this blue light. When your eyes are exposed to it directly, the blue light halts production of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin and makes you feel more alert. In the afternoon, the sun’s rays lose their blue light, which allows your body to produce melatonin and start making you sleepy. By the evening, your brain doesn’t expect any blue light exposure and is very sensitive to it.

Most of our favorite evening devices — laptops, tablets and mobile phones — emit short-wavelength blue light brightly and right in your face. This exposure impairs melatonin production and interferes with your ability to fall asleep as well as with the quality of your sleep once you do nod off. As we’ve all experienced, a poor night’s sleep has disastrous effects. The best thing you can do is to avoid these devices after dinner (television is OK for most people as long as they sit far enough away from the set).

2. Impulsively surfing the internet.

It takes you 15 consecutive minutes of focus before you can fully engage in a task. Once you do, you fall into a euphoric state of increased productivity called flow. Research shows that people in a flow state are five times more productive than they otherwise would be. When you click out of your work because you get an itch to check the news, Facebook, a sport’s score or what have you, this pulls you out of flow. This means you have to go through another 15 minutes of continuous focus to reenter the flow state. Click in and out of your work enough times, and you can go through an entire day without experiencing flow.

3. Checking your phone during a conversation.

Nothing turns people off like a mid-conversation text message or even a quick glance at your phone. When you commit to a conversation, focus all your energy on the conversation. You will find that conversations are more enjoyable and effective when you immerse yourself in them.

4. Using multiple notifications.

Multiple notifications are a productivity nightmare. Studies have shown that hopping on your phone and e-mail every time they ping for your attention causes your productivity to plummet. Getting notified every time a message drops onto your phone or an e-mail arrives in your inbox might feel productive, but it isn’t. Instead of working at the whim of your notifications, pool all your e-mails/texts and check them at designated times (e.g., respond to your e-mails every hour). This is a proven, productive way to work.

5. Saying “yes” when you should say “no.”

Research conducted at the University of California in San Francisco shows that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout and even depression, all of which erode self-control. Saying no is indeed a major self-control challenge for many people. “No” is a powerful word that you should not be afraid to wield. When it’s time to say no, emotionally intelligent people avoid phrases like “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” Saying no to a new commitment honors your existing commitments and gives you the opportunity to successfully fulfill them. Just remind yourself that saying no is an act of self-control now that will increase your future self-control by preventing the negative effects of over commitment.

6. Thinking about toxic people.

There are always going to be toxic people who have a way of getting under your skin and staying there. Each time you find yourself thinking about a coworker or person who makes your blood boil, practice being grateful for someone else in your life instead. There are plenty of people out there who deserve your attention, and the last thing you want to do is think about the people who don’t matter when there are people who do.

7. Multitasking during meetings.

You should never give anything half of your attention, especially meetings. If a meeting isn’t worth your full attention, then you shouldn’t be attending it in the first place; and if the meeting is worth your full attention, then you need to get everything you can out of it. Multitasking during meetings hurts you by creating the impression that you believe you are more important than everyone else.

8. Gossiping.

Gossipers derive pleasure from other people’s misfortunes. It might be fun to peer into somebody else’s personal or professional faux pas at first, but over time, it gets tiring, makes you feel gross and hurts other people. There are too many positives out there and too much to learn from interesting people to waste your time talking about the misfortune of others.

“Great minds discuss ideas, average ones discuss events and small minds discuss people.”   — Eleanor Roosevelt

9. Waiting to act until you know you’ll succeed.

Most writers spend countless hours brainstorming their characters and plots, and they even write page after page that they know they’ll never include in the books. They do this because they know that ideas need time to develop. We tend to freeze up when it’s time to get started because we know that our ideas aren’t perfect and that what we produce might not be any good. But how can you ever produce something great if you don’t get started and give your ideas time to evolve? Author Jodi Picoult summarized the importance of avoiding perfectionism perfectly: “You can edit a bad page, but you can’t edit a blank page.”

10. Comparing yourself to other people.

When your sense of pleasure and satisfaction are derived from comparing yourself to others, you are no longer the master of your own happiness. When you feel good about something that you’ve done, don’t allow anyone’s opinions or accomplishments take that away from you. While it’s impossible to turn off your reactions to what others think of you, you don’t have to compare yourself to others and you can always take people’s opinions with a grain of salt. That way, no matter what other people are thinking or doing, your self-worth comes from within. Regardless of what people think of you at any particular moment, one thing is certain — you’re never as good or bad as they say you are.

Bringing It All Together

By practicing self-control to break these bad habits, you can simultaneously strengthen your self-control muscle and abolish nasty habits that have the power to bring your career to a grinding halt.

 
 

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Ingredients for Creativity and Innovation

Ingredients for Creativity and Innovation

I rather liked this article. It reminded me that I use several of these techniques but must make a habit of using them continuously to maximize my potential. As a Virtual Assistant my days are never exactly the same, so I have to work harder at making good practices into second-nature.

7 ingredients for Creativity and Innovation

by Eve Ash / Tuesday, May 10 2016

Click for Full Article and Credits

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“Discovery” Albert Szent-Gyorgyi wrote, “is seeing what everybody else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought”. Very true, which is why all workplaces seeking to make their mark should provide the following necessary conditions for creativity and innovation.

Space

This means a certain amount of latitude to pursue a problem or consider alternatives. It is difficult to be innovative when someone is micromanaging you or tut-tutting about the state of your desk or personal circumstances. If a project’s outcomes aren’t pressing, or if a person really does their most inspired work alone or even at home, let them get on with it (providing of course you’ve seen that this does work for that person).

Boundaries

Workplaces invariably have rules and restrictions, so creativity must be able to be triggered within certain expectations or constraints (which is not the same as micromanaging). When there’s a deadline to meet, or a client is jumping up and down, we need people who can thrive on a slightly frenetic atmosphere and under these circumstances turn out creative solutions. But the boundaries must be clear and tangible – not shifting goalposts.

Challenge

Then there are those among us who are a little bit feisty; people who love it when a metaphorical gauntlet is thrown down. Most people love competition. Providing there’s a level playing field where the rules are clear, the incentives are there and stringent penalties exist to prevent cheats, a challenge can produce wonderful ideas and refinements on what currently exists in the marketplace.

Jolt

It’s important to give ourselves a small jolt from time to time. Everyone is apt to become a little stale, irrespective of their daily output or viability of routines. Human beings lap up interesting concepts, new ways of seeing and experiencing things, visiting places never seen – the list goes on. Find new external stimuli – go to an interesting lecture, listen to a debate, pick up a book you’ve heard about and read it to the end, find a relevant best practice article related to your work. Or go and volunteer somewhere completely different for a few days.

Stretch

Start stretching your body and honing your health and fitness in ways you’ve never tried. Even sitting straight (standing preferably) acts as a stimulant to a brain’s electric circuitry. There’s no need to become obsessive, but a few minutes of intense physical activity will cause tingling endorphins and a feeling of wellbeing, which in turn sparks fresh approaches to your life.

Mix

Once in while take people from different areas of the business and different teams and create a multidisciplinary mini-team that can brainstorm and solve issues together. Just the simple action of mixing non-traditional roles can release a whole new way of approaching tasks. Accept different approaches and find ways to BUILD on each others ideas without offence.

Special

Create special places at work to have fun and “incubate” ideas, for example, by adding whiteboards on pillars, breakout rooms with fun seating, or a games room. But ensure there are ways to record the ideas. Make sure everyone is encouraged to write down ideas, whether in groups or alone. Regularly review ideas – keep lists fresh and fun, and celebrate the implementation of new ideas.

 
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Posted by on May 10, 2016 in Time Management

 

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Oversubscribed and Unrated… Virtual Assistant tricks

Oversubscribed and Unrated… Virtual Assistant tricks

Oversubscribed and Unrated… Virtual Assistant tricks ~ Too much junk mail / Unsubscribe to Save your Inbox

Have you ever looked at your INBOX and just shook your head at all the newsletters, sales ads, and other email marketing. It’s so easy to just swipe and delete on the smartphones, when what we really should be doing is subscribing to the stuff we truly are NOT INTERESTED in. Many reasons:

  • Your sanity from not having to see these things and swiping your little heart out.
  • Accurate and beneficial email marketing results.

    • WHAT DO I MEAN BY THAT?? Well, I’m right now in the process of setting up Google AdWords campaigns for two clients. This is what drew my attention to this particle email piece I receive regularly but usually delete. ~ Go Figure ~ The Irony! That said,
    •  As a consumer searching the WWW for information, interests, goods, and services; you want the best results / most suited to YOUR needs.
    • As a business owner you want the right customers finding YOU.
    • So in the email marketing campaign, by not unsubscribing our marketing dollars and targets are being blown far away from our MARKETING GOALS.

It just takes to long to open every one of those emails and unsubscribe…

Well that’s where we come in handy ~ The Write Hand, LLC

Reliable and timely management of your emails, calendars, contacts, and so much more!!!

  • Build / Re-Build / Manage Websites
  • e-Blasts / Newsletters
  • LinkedIn Profiles and Affiliate Connections / Social Media Marketing
  • QuickBooks Online
  • Resume Writing
  • Transcription of written or image documents – meeting notes, punchlists, manuscripts, letters, etc…

GoDaddy Reseller – Purchase your DIY products cheaper through The Write Hand, LLC

 
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Effective FB Advertising Virtual Assistant Tricks

Effective FB Advertising Virtual Assistant Tricks

This is one more of those emails I debate whether to “UNSUBSCRIBE” and Clean my Inbox of recurring emails that mostly I NOT INTERESTED in. This time – I took the time and I really enjoyed a lot of this lady’s perspective on Facebook Advertising.

Things that make you go hmmmmm… time to rearrange and keep up…

Full Article and Credit Here

February 3, 2016 — Posted By

Bigger is always better, right?

When it comes to Facebook advertising and your audience—think again!

Advertising in general is both an art and a science, and the same is absolutely true when advertising on Facebook.

This week’s Mari Minute poses the question: what is the ideal audience size for your Facebook ads?

Given that there are 1.59 billion monthly active users on Facebook, it seems almost counterintuitive to aim small, but as Facebook explains it,  “the ad in your ad set is likely to perform better if it’s displayed to the people who are most likely to be interested in your product or service.”

The reality is that a smaller number means you are targeting specific users to help you achieve a desired outcome, as opposed to casting a wide net and just seeing what sticks. For you as the advertiser, aiming smaller will allow you to narrow in on the exact type of customer or client that your business really wants.

Tips for Successful Audience Targeting

  1. Aim for an ideal audience size between 30,000-300,000 users.
  2. Use Interest & Behavior Targeting to narrow down the audience size.
  3. Use Detailed Targeting in the Power Editor to use Boolean search terms, like “and” “or” to reach users that, for example, like Mexican food AND Los Angeles, or Mexican food AND Los Angeles or Orange County.
  4. When building your ad, aim to get the Audience Definition meter somewhere in the middle between specific and broad.
 
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Posted by on March 3, 2016 in Time Management

 

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Self-Filing Taxes vs. Hiring an Accountant: The Cost Breakdown

Self-Filing Taxes vs. Hiring an Accountant: The Cost Breakdown

The Write Hand, LLC is a Virtual Assistant Company

At The Write Hand, LLC, we are dedicated to helping small business owners eliminate and manage all sorts of administrative tasks. We have assistants with a variety of talents enabling us to create and maintain websites, create and distribute all manners of marketing collateral, down to simple tasks like scheduling, email clean-up, travel reservations and so much more. We like to share articles of value when we come across them and we hope you’ll enjoy this one…

Self-Filing Taxes vs. Hiring an Accountant: The Cost Breakdown

From Kabbage – Click Here for Full Article and Credits

To file, or hire it done, that is the question. Whether ‘tis nobler in the pocketbook to hire a professional, or to suffer the slings and errors of doing it all yourself…

Tax time is on us, and that means struggling with a question millions of small business owners ask themselves every year: is it worth the money to hire an accountant?

Fifteen years ago, the answer was clear. Unless you’re an accountant yourself, hire it done. With the new(ish) wave of websites and apps that do the hardest parts for you, though, filing your own taxes is within the ability of many small and most micro business owners. It boils down to a question of cost.

Let’s look at those costs…

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The Costs of Self-Filing

The good news here is that the cash costs of filing correctly are free as compared to filing via a professional. Yes, state filings include a nominal fee — but your accountant includes that fee in his charges, so there’s no difference there. Additional costs of self-filing fall into three categories:

  • The cost of labor. The average personal tax filing requires 16 hours of record keeping, tax planning and filling out of forms. The average business tax filing requires 24 hours for small businesses and increases exponentially as the operation becomes larger and more complex. This could represent cash laid out for a bookkeeper or office manager, or your own precious time.
  • Costs of organization. If you want to come in at anything near the estimated times above, you need to have your business finances in relatively good order. This means paying a bookkeeper, buying financial software, organizing paper records and/or a combination of all three. There’s no true average cost of making this happen, but it will cost you time and money.
  • Software and apps. TurboTax, TaxAct and similar tax preparation help sites are what make this question reasonable, but they do come at a cost. TurboTax costs $80 for federal small business tax filing, while TaxAct costs $50 for federal taxes. Both charge an additional fee for state filing, which varies by state but is rarely higher than the cost for federal filing.

The bad news here is that those low costs are for filing correctly. If it’s an honest mistake, the IRS will ask you to correct the information, and charge you 0.5 percent of any overdue payment for every month it’s late. Considering how long it takes the IRS to process your taxes, you can already have racked up six months or more worth of interest penalties before you even find out about the error.

If they think you filed untrue information intentionally, you’re in a huge world of hurt. Don’t even think about it.

The Costs of Hiring an Accountant

Hiring an accountant is pretty straightforward, cost-wise. On average, it costs about $420 to professionally prepare a Schedule E or C tax filing. This doesn’t include any filing fees you would pay if you filed yourself, but in terms of out-of-pocket expense it’s comparable to the $50 to $80 you would pay to use an online tax service to help you prepare on your own.

It’s important to remember that some of the costs of labor and organization still fall in your lap if you hire an accountant. That $400 charge only happens if you show up with your books already in order, and are able to quickly answer any questions the accountant might have. If you drop off a bunch of disorganized notes, your accountant will charge you for the time spent putting it together…and his/her time costs more than your time or your office manager’s.

On the plus side, hiring a professional accountant provides some protection from the costs of incorrectly filing your taxes. If the mistake was because you gave bad information, those fees are generally your problem. But if you provided accurate information and the tax filings were prepared wrong, that’s what their errors and omissions insurance is for.

The Middle Ground

Choosing whether to hire an accountant or to prepare taxes on your own is a matter of weighing risks, costs and opportunities. Whichever direction you choose, there are ways to mitigate risks and costs that might shade your decision toward one direction or another.

  • If preparing your own taxes, use a tax preparation service and opt-in for their audit protection and other error protection services. It’s not 100 percent protection against everything that could go wrong, but it is a cost-effective way of hedging your bets.
  • If hiring an accountant, ask your accountant exactly how he/she likes to receive documents. Put in the time to have them exactly that way. This will keep your accountant’s time spent at a minimum and keep your fees as low as possible.

Our Recommendation

Since every business is different, there’s no right or wrong answer to this question. However, we can give some general advice based on the trends we’ve seen among our own clients:

  • Very small businesses, including sole proprietorships, microbusinesses and most home-based operations, aren’t much more complex that the personal filings you make when you have income from a business. If you’re filing successfully for yourself, you can probably file successfully for your business.
  • Small businesses with equipment to depreciate and employees with payroll are usually better off hiring an accountant. The variables and complexities are too numerous to do successfully without costing you more time and energy than you would save…unless you or a staff member (or a family member) is already confident and experienced with bookkeeping and tax preparation.
  • Medium businesses with complex payroll, multiple locations and other complications should hire an accountant. Even experienced tax people who don’t do taxes professionally can’t count on knowing all the changes and updates to the tax code that could be relevant.
  • Multi-state and other large enterprises should always hire professionals for the job. In fact, at this size there’s a good chance you’ll want an accountant on your payroll full time.

We do our best to report truthfully with up-to-date information, but none of us are tax lawyers and you should take this advice as advice only. If you have any serious tax questions, check with a professional.

Sometimes, small businesses end up in a crack where a tax refund will set them right but they don’t have the money on hand to hire an accountant. In such cases, a Kabbage loan can be a quick and cost-effective way to bridge that gap. Find out more today.

 

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Starting a Business After 40: Part 3 – Learning How to Market Yourself

Starting a Business After 40: Part 3 – Learning How to Market Yourself

The Write Hand, LLC is a Virtual Assistant Company

At The Write Hand, LLC, we are dedicated to helping small business owners eliminate and manage all sorts of administrative tasks. We have assistants with a variety of talents enabling us to create and maintain websites, create and distribute all manners of marketing collateral, down to simple tasks like scheduling, email clean-up, travel reservations and so much more. We like to share articles of value when we come across them and we hope you’ll enjoy this one…

Starting a Business After 40: Part 3 – Learning How to Market Yourself

From Kabbage – Click Here For Full Article and Credits

Finding and developing a niche in business is a great way to attract the kinds of people you want to work with, but don’t expect overnight success. You will need to work at positioning yourself as the go-to expert in your niche, as well as market your message in the right channels to reach your audience.

In Part 1  of this series, we discussed choosing your niche, and in Part 2 , how to gain experience in it. Here, let’s talk about marketing yourself in your niche. In her book, Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future, author Dorie Clark provides several insightful tips to do just that.

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Find Your Unique Selling Proposition

Clark says you need to know what’s unique about you so that you can convey it to others. This will be the basis of your marketing going forward. Additionally, she suggests you consider “what skills or abilities you possess that are in short supply in your new field.” Knowing what gaps there are that you can fill makes you even more attractive as a niche provider.

Clark also says not to fear being an outsider: even if you’re moving into an industry you have little to no experience in, find ways to relate the experiences you do have to making you uniquely qualified to view problems and solutions from a different angle.

Build Your Narrative

The next step in preparing your niche marketing is to craft your narrative:

“Humans understand the world around them through stories, narratives we tell ourselves about what’s happening and why,” Clark explains.

What is your brand, and why are you focused on this niche? Cut-and-dry answers won’t make your story resonate as well as a well-told narrative. Maybe your grandpa was in this industry and he taught you everything you know. That’s a story. Maybe you had a wake-up call after 10 years as an investment banker when you had a heart attack, and now you’re focused on living a better quality of life through your new company. Find a way to make your story relatable. Evoking emotions never hurts!

Apply Your Niche to Content Marketing

Content marketing is still one of the best ways to impart your knowledge on a topic, and the more niche that content is, the better. As you get to know your audience, you’ll better understand what topics they care about. Sometimes, though, it’s trial and error. In Stand Out: How to Find Your Breakthrough Idea and Build a Following Around It, Clark says:

“Sometimes you have to experiment with a lot of ideas and see which one sticks. If you’re unsure, let the market decide. Which posts receive the most comments, or retweets, or e-mail inquiries? What seems to capture people’s imagination? Finding your niche is not an exact science, and you often won’t know in advance what will work.”

Not sure where to start? Try conducting research and writing reviews, Clark suggests. Both give you authority in your field, and help expand your knowledge.

Also, Clark says that repurposing content gives you even more ways to reach people. For example, can you take one blog article and expand it into a longer ebook? Create a series of videos or emails? Share tidbits via Twitter?

Get to Know the Media

Another marketing technique Clark suggests in Stand Out is developing relationships with traditional media:

“Being quoted in the mainstream media is useful because they often still have large audiences, even in an era of fragmented reading and viewing habits. Plus, their third-party validation lends credibility to you. If you’re quoted in The New York Times or have appeared on the Today show, that’s a public signal that you’re an authority.”

Keep Your Own Marketing Channel Preferences in Mind

People may tell you that podcasting or videos are the must-have marketing tools, but if you’re uncomfortable with the medium, they won’t work for you. Clark says it’s no good forcing yourself to use a tool if you dislike it.

Instead, focus on the channels that make sense. If you enjoy writing, blogging and book-writing may be a natural fit. If you love speaking to your audience, video is worth considering.

Scale Your Efforts Strategically

Why help one person with your knowledge if you can help five…or 5,000? Clark brings up the example of Quora, a website people go to in order to find answers to their questions. Thousands of industry experts weigh in on questions, building their authority and credibility.

If you start getting the same questions from people over and over, realize that there are even more people out there that want the same questions answered. Determine the best way to help more people with your answer. You could post the question and answer to Quora, or write a blog post and then share it on LinkedIn. There are numerous ways to share your knowledge with more people with a little ingenuity.

Because you’re talking to such a small sector of the population about the niche you serve, your marketing needs to be extremely targeted and valuable. But the more value people get from your marketing messages and content, the higher your conversion to new customers will be!

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2016 in Small Business News

 

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